Throop Mill

Reply from Councillor Ronald Whittaker to Peter Trickett

11th November 2009

RE: Throop Mill

Peter,

Again thank you, the Building now being closed since 1972, it really becomes extremely depressing, knowing that out in the market someone could put this lovely building back into life by opening it up to visitors to see much of the remaining/existing machinery which is still in place, ideas put forward have been a visitor centre / craft shop / organic shop with a cafeteria, many of these ideas that have been floated over many past years, sadly the owners seem content to leave the building in a close/empty.

Am sure the late Cis who worked and love the Mill and died within the building would now love to see visitors/children of all ages enjoying these lovely grade 2 building.

A wonderful detail book has been written on Cis life at the Mill by Elizabeth Edwards Link, it is such a fitting tribute to Cis, more so to the history of the Mill.

Any way Peter thank you, will pass on these comments to English Heritage, know are hands are tied, but if only the owners would attempt to see if interest remain out in the Market.

Councillor Ron Whittaker

Reply from Peter Trickett to Councillor Ron Whittaker

10th November 2009

RE: Throop Mill

Dear Councillor Whittaker,

Thank you for your comments in connection with Throop Mill. I concord with your opinion.

In connection with further movement of the structure I anticipate this will continue. The rate of movement will be dependant on the conditions to which the race wall, (foundation to the end wall of the mill) is subjected. Should the ground conditions remain stable the structure is likely to be little affected. Should we experience adverse weather conditions e.g. heavy rainfall causing flooding and erosion adjacent to the foundations or indeed a very dry period which may cause shrinkage of the soil below the foundation the rate of movement may accelerate. Fortunately very adverse conditions such as Boscastle are rare where buildings are destroyed as a result of tempest.

The longer the building is neglected the more work will need to be undertaken to repair it.

I assume the current owners are aware of the defects but have chosen not to act at this present time.

Having said this our duty as the Local Authority section administering the Building Act is to protect members of the public from defective buildings. The movement of Throop mill will need to be significantly more resulting in loosening of masonry before we can act.

A copy of this correspondence has been passed to Nigel Billett for his information in respect of protection of listed buildings under Planning in addition I have sent a copy to Ian Butterfield our Building Control Manager for his information.

Peter Trickett

Senior Building Control Officer

Planning and Transport

Reply by Councillor Ronald Whittaker

8th November 2009

RE: Throop Mill

Peter,

Can I thank you for this very detail report on my concerns of Throop Mill, sadly it seems all we can do is to see these lovely grade 2 listed building will over time it seems cause further damage by neglect, unless as you say ,maintenance of the guttering and down pipes, and a severe cut back of those trees that have and are causing much of the present damage, besides making the right-of way [bridleway] path some what slippery with the weather.

Your comments re-movement of the outer sidewall of the race below the building naturally means nothing to me, not having any experience in that field], as you make reference to further movement cannot be ruled out, what would be the implications to the building if such movement was further detected.

Fully understand that it seems we cannot act under the existing legislation, my frustrations are that this lovely building could bring so much to Throop by bringing it back into life with a business activity, instead of seeing it remaining empty.

Mean time thank you Peter.

E-mail sent by Peter Trickett to Councillor Ron Whittaker

5th November 2009

Throop Mill

Dear Councillor Whittaker,

I have today visited Throop Mill in response to your concern regarding the stability of the building. I have inspected the premises on a number of occasions to give opinions in connection with this matter and other defects.

I have observed the cracking to the elevation facing the Public Footpath and the front elevation facing the car park. The cracking indicates the end of the building facing toward the water meadows has rotated away from the remainder of the building. I would attribute this to the movement of the outer sidewall of the race below the building.

I have been aware of this defect for a number of years. Until repair has been made to the sidewall of the race, further movement cannot be ruled out. From external ground level there appears to have been no problems with the roof.

Having said this, the structure is in my opinion stable at this time. My observation of the external walls reveals they are not bulging; indicating wall tie failure causing the problem. The cracks are dirty which indicates no recent movement. The cracks at ground level are narrow (6mm), at first floor 12mm and second 19mm approximately.

I concur with your observation that neglect of the structure will cause further damage but we are unable to take action under our legislation at this time. Maintenance of the guttering and down pipes would of course assist with the protection of the structure. Overhanging Oak trees have choked the guttering to the effect that they are non operational.

I trust the above comments are of assistance.

Peter Trickett

Senior Building Control Officer

Planning and Transport